Tuesday, 16 December 2008

Building a fantasy art portfolio

When building a fantasy art portfolio it is best to include lots of examples of different media artwork to attract clients by showing them that you can deliver high quality fantasy art in a variety of media styles and formats.

Your art samples need to reflect your art style but also the kind of work you are capable of producing to a set standard, which is usually of a high standard.

Fantasy art is usually shown throughout popular exhibitions as painted works, but now we are seeing a lot of examples of digital artwork that really is something to look at and basic pencil drawings showing the raw creative process and random ideas come to life on scraps of paper too.



And so building a good fantasy art portfolio is just like picking and selecting the areas of this art form that you like and create a sense of structure for your display to show to potential clients and employers. By writing a contents page that is your first page you show what the contents of your portfolio contain and therefore this leads your collection of samples more likely to be opened and reviewed, because let's face it you need to know how to get your work seen by employing certain tricks and techniques.


Art portfolios need not be filled with too much art that the art director or potential employer won't have time to go through it, instead a simple small A4 or A3 size portfolio case should do for this and at least 2 to 3 examples for each media.


At the front of your portfolio it is best to have a contents page so that the editor or whoever is viewing your work can easily know what to expect, think of blog post titles this helps me!


If you know of a company that creates great products with fantasy artwork then you know what they are looking for, so try and aim for a collection of artwork samples that aim to deliver what that company or studio expects.